Higher Ed

 

Higher Ed

From “I Still Can’t Work with You” to “Let’s Work Together”: Creating a Rhetoric of Collaboration that Supports Professors

Thomas Sura and Julia Daniel / Julia Daniel and Thomas Sura

Because professors stand to gain so much through equitable evaluation of collaborative work (and we are not just talking tenure), we argue that the rhetoric of collaboration in the humanities can do more to support professors. . . .

 

Higher Ed

The Sky Is Falling

Eric Hayot

I want to persuade you, therefore, to abandon any sense of complacency and to believe that we are facing at this moment—right now—a crisis in the humanities. Without action, we humanists, and the graduate and undergraduate students we care about and serve, stand to lose a great deal. . . .

 

Higher Ed

Whether Wit or Wisdom: Resisting the Decline of the Humanities from Within

Paul T. Corrigan

In narrating the life and death of a literature professor, Wit asks what literature—particularly the study of literature in college—might offer in life and in death. Susie’s question gestures broadly: What is the end, or purpose, of literature? What significance does literature offer readers’ lives? How might teaching enable or hinder that significance? . . .

 

Higher Ed

The Relevance and Resiliency of the Humanities

Stephen C. Behrendt

[T]he humanities are good for taking us out of our isolated selves and situating us among others who are both like and unlike ourselves, helping us both to see and to measure, to imagine and to create. . . .

Photo from Miami University
Photo from Miami University

Higher Ed

Redefining the Teaching-Research Nexus Today

Vanessa L. Ryan

What if teaching and research, for all this support, do not necessarily reinforce each other? The link between research and teaching may be important to the identity of many academics, but might it not perhaps be better described as a myth? . . .

Photo from Miami University
Photo from Miami University

Higher Ed

University Service: The History of an Idea

Leonard Cassuto

Professors in the United States are socialized to view their jobs as some combination of teaching, research, and service. Teaching sometimes leads the tricolon, and sometimes research comes first. . . . But service always comes last. Why? . . .

Photo from Bessie Tift College
Photo from Bessie Tift College

Higher Ed

The Conflicted Status of Humanities Research in the Contemporary University

David R. Shumway

There is no easy solution to the problems that beset research in the humanities today, but there are measures that might help. For one, the value of our research needs to be explained and defended to those outside our disciplines. . . .

Photo from Miami University
Photo from Miami University

Higher Ed

Rethinking the Tricolon Teaching, Research, Service: A Cluster of Essays

Sidonie Smith

The triad is our common measure, our common discourse, our common complaint. . . . The terms in our mantra appear coequal, but we know only too well that each term carries different weight, holds different value, and applies differently to those in different faculty appointments. . . .

Photo by Stephanie Carter
Photo by Stephanie Carter

Higher Ed

The Humanities as Service Departments: Facing the Budget Logic

Christopher Newfield

What kind of budgetary future do the humanities have in public universities? Dire predictions have been around for years and take many plausible forms (Donoghue), including the retreat of humanities research into wealthy private universities for the dwindling leisure class. . . .

Photo by Life Pilgrim
Photo by Life Pilgrim

Case Study

Lessons from the State University of New York, Albany: Program Elimination, Administrative Power, and Shared Governance

Brett Bowles

On 1 October 2010, the provost and the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at the State University of New York, Albany . . . convened faculty members in French, Italian, Russian, Classics, and Theater to inform them of the decision to deactivate all degree programs in their fields. . . .
Skip to toolbar