Higher Ed

Photo from Miami University
Photo from Miami University

Higher Ed

Redefining the Teaching-Research Nexus Today

Vanessa L. Ryan

What if teaching and research, for all this support, do not necessarily reinforce each other? The link between research and teaching may be important to the identity of many academics, but might it not perhaps be better described as a myth? . . .

Photo from Miami University
Photo from Miami University

Higher Ed

University Service: The History of an Idea

Leonard Cassuto

Professors in the United States are socialized to view their jobs as some combination of teaching, research, and service. Teaching sometimes leads the tricolon, and sometimes research comes first. . . . But service always comes last. Why? . . .

Photo from Bessie Tift College
Photo from Bessie Tift College

Higher Ed

The Conflicted Status of Humanities Research in the Contemporary University

David R. Shumway

There is no easy solution to the problems that beset research in the humanities today, but there are measures that might help. For one, the value of our research needs to be explained and defended to those outside our disciplines. . . .

Photo from Miami University
Photo from Miami University

Higher Ed

Rethinking the Tricolon Teaching, Research, Service: A Cluster of Essays

Sidonie Smith

The triad is our common measure, our common discourse, our common complaint. . . . The terms in our mantra appear coequal, but we know only too well that each term carries different weight, holds different value, and applies differently to those in different faculty appointments. . . .

Photo by Stephanie Carter
Photo by Stephanie Carter

Higher Ed

The Humanities as Service Departments: Facing the Budget Logic

Christopher Newfield

What kind of budgetary future do the humanities have in public universities? Dire predictions have been around for years and take many plausible forms (Donoghue), including the retreat of humanities research into wealthy private universities for the dwindling leisure class. . . .

Photo by Life Pilgrim
Photo by Life Pilgrim

Case Study

Lessons from the State University of New York, Albany: Program Elimination, Administrative Power, and Shared Governance

Brett Bowles

On 1 October 2010, the provost and the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at the State University of New York, Albany . . . convened faculty members in French, Italian, Russian, Classics, and Theater to inform them of the decision to deactivate all degree programs in their fields. . . .

Photo by Christian Weidinger
Photo by Christian Weidinger

Case Study

CUNY’s Pathways to Substandard Education for the “Whole People”

Sandi E. Cooper

The trustees of the City University of New York (CUNY) voted in June 2011 to implement Pathways—a project of the vice chancellor for academic affairs, Alexandra Logue, which purported to ease transfer among undergraduates, largely from two- to four-year colleges. . . .

Photo by Irene Grassi
Photo by Irene Grassi

Case Study

From Crisis to Opportunities: How One College of Humanities Survived and Thrived from 2008 to 2014

Mary Wildner-Bassett

As we have seen so often in Profession or the Chronicle of Higher Education, and many similar publications concerning American and global postsecondary institutions and their programs, the state of the humanities in general is a topic for debate and commentary. . . .

Photo by alex
Photo by alex

Higher Ed

Closures and Mergers: The Theory and Practice of Restructuring Humanities Programs in the American Academy

Clorinda Donato and Susan C. Anderson

At institutions large and small, public or private, the rhetoric and reality of cuts, mergers, and closures have become familiar to anyone working in humanities disciplines, with the fields of classical and modern languages coming under particularly intense scrutiny in recent years. . . .

Photo by Delaney Turner
Photo by Delaney Turner

Case Study

Beyond Program Closures, the Menace of Slow Defunding

Philip E. Lewis

Let me try to set the stage for discussion of our announced topic, the cost of program mergers and closings. I first considered the topic of closings when, three years ago, the immediate past president of the Mellon Foundation, Don Randel, asked me whether we should consider a grant-making initiative. . . .
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