Higher Ed

The Sky Is Falling

Eric Hayot

I want to persuade you, therefore, to abandon any sense of complacency and to believe that we are facing at this moment—right now—a crisis in the humanities. Without action, we humanists, and the graduate and undergraduate students we care about and serve, stand to lose a great deal. . . .

 

Higher Ed

Whether Wit or Wisdom: Resisting the Decline of the Humanities from Within

Paul T. Corrigan

In narrating the life and death of a literature professor, Wit asks what literature—particularly the study of literature in college—might offer in life and in death. Susie’s question gestures broadly: What is the end, or purpose, of literature? What significance does literature offer readers’ lives? How might teaching enable or hinder that significance? . . .

 

Curriculum

Assassin’s Creed Taught Me Italian: Video Games and the Quest for Lifelong, Ubiquitous Learning

Simone Bregni

We have learned that games can offer many advantages to language learners and can turn what is typically viewed as a mindless extracurricular activity into a vibrant learning experience that extends beyond the confines of the classroom. . . .

 

Curriculum

Hypertext and “Twitterature”

Massimo Lollini

While Web-based literary projects tend to function like textual archives and repositories for commentary, this project enables readers to compare the various textual configurations of the Rvf and, in the process, participate in the seven-centuries-long tradition of actively reading, interpreting, and rewriting the text. . . .

 

Higher Ed

The Relevance and Resiliency of the Humanities

Stephen C. Behrendt

[T]he humanities are good for taking us out of our isolated selves and situating us among others who are both like and unlike ourselves, helping us both to see and to measure, to imagine and to create. . . .


More Articles

 

Graduate Studies

The Work of the Humanities

Kelly Anne Brown and Rebecca Lippman

Deflated, depressed, and undervalued, many humanities graduates finish their degrees with little confidence that they will have anything to offer employers outside the university. . . . Many students do not know how to articulate their time in graduate school as work experience. . . .

Photo by Drew Coffman
Photo by Drew Coffman

Graduate Studies

The Profession Does Not Need the Monograph Dissertation

Eric Hayot

I say that a collection of articles can prove that someone can do original, publishable scholarship as well as a dissertation. But of course I don’t know, and neither do you. No one will know until someone tries it. . . .

 

Graduate Studies

Beyond the Numbers: Plotting the Field of Humanities PhDs at Work

Kelly Anne Brown

Though tracking those who left the academy to pursue a range of careers postdegree looks from the outset to be an exercise in data collection, it is really about the stories—absent, untold, ignored—for which we use numbers as a placeholder. . . .

 

Graduate Studies

Connecting the Curriculum: A Collaborative Reinvention for Humanities PhDs

Eric Wertheimer and George Justice

We recall (and treasure) individual classes and professors. But little else about why and how we were moving through this particular curriculum stands out. We can’t help thinking that we are not alone in having this experience and that this gap is, unfortunately, status quo in our profession . . .

 

Graduate Studies

Mentors, Projects, Deliverables: Internships and Fellowships for Doctoral Students in the Humanities

Rachel Arteaga and Kathleen Woodward

Since 2013 new graduate internship programs have been announced from Florida to California, and practice-based fellowships have also proliferated. Both are welcome responses to today’s spirited national conversation on the changes absolutely necessary to doctoral education and training . . .

Photo from Miami University
Photo from Miami University

Higher Ed

Redefining the Teaching-Research Nexus Today

Vanessa L. Ryan

What if teaching and research, for all this support, do not necessarily reinforce each other? The link between research and teaching may be important to the identity of many academics, but might it not perhaps be better described as a myth? . . .

Photo from Miami University
Photo from Miami University

Higher Ed

University Service: The History of an Idea

Leonard Cassuto

Professors in the United States are socialized to view their jobs as some combination of teaching, research, and service. Teaching sometimes leads the tricolon, and sometimes research comes first. . . . But service always comes last. Why? . . .

Photo from Bessie Tift College
Photo from Bessie Tift College

Higher Ed

The Conflicted Status of Humanities Research in the Contemporary University

David R. Shumway

There is no easy solution to the problems that beset research in the humanities today, but there are measures that might help. For one, the value of our research needs to be explained and defended to those outside our disciplines. . . .

Photo from Miami University
Photo from Miami University

Higher Ed

Rethinking the Tricolon Teaching, Research, Service: A Cluster of Essays

Sidonie Smith

The triad is our common measure, our common discourse, our common complaint. . . . The terms in our mantra appear coequal, but we know only too well that each term carries different weight, holds different value, and applies differently to those in different faculty appointments. . . .

Ferdinand Pauwels
Ferdinand Pauwels

Perspectives

95 Theses

Charles Bernstein

1. Professionalism is a means not an end. Less is more. Professors are better off when they professionalize less and risk extinction when professionalization is primary.

2. Professionalized scholarly writing often seems to play off a list of master-theorists who must be cited, even if the subject is overcoming mastery. . . .

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